Welcome to the New Year!

Back to Article
Back to Article

Welcome to the New Year!

Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

The Ranger Staff

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






January 1st is celebrated in many different ways. According to the History Channel, the Babylonians were the first to write accounts of their new year celebrations – although their year started in mid-March at the planting of the crops.

There are many traditions associated with New Year’s Day. Some people eat black-eyed peas, cabbage, and ham for good luck. In Italy, some people wear red underwear to bring luck throughout the year. Some believe that eating leafy greens on New Year’s Day will bring wealth and prosperity for the year.

But the biggest tradition is making New Year’s resolutions. A resolution is a stated intention, something that a person commits to do or follow through with during the coming year. The ancient Babylonians are thought to be the first people to make New Year’s resolutions 4,000 years ago. During medieval times, knights took a “peacock vow” at the end of the Christmas season. A peacock was cooked and served at a huge feast, where the knights made or renewed their vows of chivalry, then enjoyed gifts of the cooked bird.

Most resolutions have to do with improving yourself, like “exercise more,” “lose weight,” or “get all A’s.” Unfortunately, according to research printed in Psychology Today, most people give up on their resolutions. Specifically, 22% fail after one week, 40% after one month, 50% after three months, 60% after six months, and 81% after twenty-four months. Only 8% are successful in achieving their goals.

Did you make a New Year’s resolution this year? Ranger staff asked students and faculty for their resolutions and these were the responses:

“To be more organized. To lose weight.” – Ms. Sharon Lowe, world history teacher

“No more caffeine, do more work, be more prepared, and be more organized!” – Samantha Reeves, 9th

“To be more organized, and to be nicer to people” – Turner Tecmire, 9th

“To get better grades this year.” – Destiny McKinney, 9th

“To be a better person.” – Madley Belt, 9th

“Write better.” Joy Cloud, 8th

“Meet better people.” – Emma Kays, 7th

“To get caught up on work in a specific class.” – Mayeli Rivas, 9th

“To get better grades.” – Brenda Galdamez, 9th

“To be vegetarian.” – Bridgette Releford, 9th

“Set my mind on something and don’t let anyone get in my way.” – Ciara Cooks, 8th

Print Friendly, PDF & Email